facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinrssyoutube

Leadership Tip: Building People Up Through Criticism

0

How to Deliver Criticism as a Leader

Criticism is a powerful tool to help someone improve one’s abilities and skills. But it can also be harmful if it is not done properly. As a coach or manager, this comes with the job. We call it coaching, judging, feedback, reviews and so on. Ultimately you are giving criticism. One of the toughest aspects of being a great leader is the ability to give constructive criticism without destroying your relationship with the receiver or their. The reason is there is a thin line between constructive and destructive criticism. Let’s define these words first.

Criticism is a powerful tool to help someone improve one’s abilities and skills. But it can also be harmful if it is not done properly. As a coach or manager, this comes with the job. We call it coaching, judging, feedback, reviews and so on. Ultimately you are giving criticism. One of the toughest aspects of being a great leader is the ability to give constructive criticism without destroying your relationship with the receiver or their. The reason is there is a thin line between constructive and destructive criticism. Let’s define these words first.

Criticism: A critical comment or judgment.

Constructive: Serving a useful purpose; tending to build up.

Destructive: Tending to negate or disparage; negative and unhelpful; Causing great and irreparable harm or damage.

Criticism by itself is an ugly word. No one wants to be criticized unless the criticism is positive or done by a respected perspective or an expert. Even when it is done by an expert, it can be a tough pill to swallow. Just look at American Idol. When a panel of experts gives them feedback, some of these people take it to heart and begin to cry. Others take it in stride and vow to get better.

Destructive criticism is never welcomed. Often times, it can create tension within your relationship because most people do not forget it. It can destroy a once healthy and respected relationship in a moment like imploding a building.

I had a manager that was great at giving proper feedback. I deeply respected him until he gave me destructive criticism. I was one of his top reps and he knew I would always come thru and get whatever he asked done. I went into his office to ask for an extension for planning my 80 accounts because it was my first Father’s Day. I told him I would plan half over the weekend and the rest on Monday. He then asked me a question, “Do you know what you are?” I replied “Awesome?”; He said, “;No. You are missing the point.” He then turned around and wrote something on a Post It note. He spun around and showed me what he wrote. It was an E. I asked “What excellent?” He wrote a word “You are full of Excuses”, he said. BOOM! My relationship respect was lost in a two minute conversation.

Constructive criticism is usually welcomed. This is because the receiver can use the feedback to get better. The goal of constructive criticism is to build up the receiver. Its purpose is to give helpful ideas, techniques and references so the receiver can use, learn and implement.

5 helpful tips to deliver constructive criticism:

1. Ask to give feedback:You gain their permission by doing this. Now it is wanted feedback. The person will be much more open to your advice.

2. Sandwich your feedback: Give positive feedback first. Follow that with an area to improve. Then end it with something positive. I prefer two positive strengths, two areas of improvement and end with a their top positive strength.

3. Two improvements maximum: Most people can only work on 1 or 2 things at a time. Look for the opportunities that yield the greatest return.

4. Be specific: Site or show the person did what they needed to improve. This will help them recall the conversation, presentation or document.

5. Provide a solution: This is critical in delivering powerful feedback. Show them an alternative way of doing or saying something. If possible, provide them a resource to improve.

Ask yourself the following question he next time you are about to deliver criticism. When I am done giving my feedback will I have built this person up or tore them down? If you second guess what you are about to say, do not open your mouth. It is better to walk away. Give your feedback at a later time.

Remember, naturally people want to move up in the world. You can help them by building them up.

Loading Facebook Comments ...

Leave A Reply